Category Archives: China

Rising Stars at the Jackson School

This week the Jackson Foundation hosted a lunch to highlight graduate students at the University of Washington’s Jackson School who are benefiting from Jackson Foundation fellowship support.  “These Jackson Fellowships represent the core of the Foundation’s long-time support for the School,” said John Hempelmann, Foundation president, in introducing the event.  “Support for high-level graduate training in international affairs is fundamental to the Jackson legacy.”

It is always inspiring and somewhat humbling to meet the young graduate students who are benefiting from the Fellowships.  They are an accomplished bunch, with many languages and research areas between them!

Craig Gannett and Andrew Munro chat with Celia Ann Baker, Jackson/Culp Fellow
Craig Gannett and Andrew Munro, Board members, chat with Celia Anne Baker, Jackson/Culp Fellow

To help the School with a new initiative, the Foundation supports a PhD student in the Jackson School’s doctoral program.  The program is pragmatic in nature – it is three years (rather than the customary five) and thematic (rather than just history, politics, or economics).  Two recent PhD fellows, Deep Pal and Oded Oron, joined Foundation Board members for lunch. Deep studies Indian foreign and security policy and follows India’s interaction with China with great interest.  Deep values the Jackson legacy in his work:  “I was first exposed to Senator Jackson’s vision of forging closer alliances in Asia during my stint with the National Bureau of Asian Research in Washington, D.C. I believe this line of thought resonates in my work – at a time when Asia is undergoing profound changes, alliances between like-minded powers like India and the United States are going to be more important.”

Deep Pal and Oded Oron, Jackson PhD Fellows
Deep Pal and Oded Oron, Jackson PhD Fellows

Oded’s research focuses on the mobilization of irregular migrants such as guest workers, undocumented migrants, asylum seekers and refuges. His dissertation compares African migrants mobilizing in Israel with migrant movements in Washington State, so the Fellowship here has been a great fit.  He is also deeply aware of the Jackson legacy in immigrant human rights, represented by the Jackson-Vanik Amendment and Jackson’s outspoken defense of the right to emigrate freely.

The Foundation also funds two Henry M. Jackson/Gordon Culp Fellows each year — one in Russian and East European Studies and one in China Studies at the School.  Ross Doll, the China Fellow, and Celia Anne Baker, the Russia Fellow, engaged the crowd as they talked about their work and the way that the Fellowship has helped them move forward professionally.  These two fields have been integral to the history of the Jackson School and were a key reason that Senator Jackson worked hard to support the School and its students during his Senate years.  The Foundation is proud to continue that tradition.

Ross Doll, Jackson/Culp Fellow
Ross Doll, Jackson/Culp Fellow
Celia Ann Baker, Jackson/Culp Fellow
Celia Anne Baker, Jackson/Culp Fellow

Resat Kasaba, Jackson School Director, spoke of the Foundation’s unstinting commitment to the School for over 30 years:  “In recent years we have introduced a new Ph.D. Program and a new Applied Master’s Program with Foundation support.   These initiatives have enriched the Jackson School’s profile significantly.   Thanks to our partnership, we have recruited top-notch students from around the world, strengthened our ties to the Pacific Northwest region, and established new relationships with the policy world in Washington D.C.  Foundation support has been critical in keeping the School at the top of its game.”

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Honoring Professor Kenneth B. Pyle

Kenneth Pyle webOur culture celebrates our sports heroes – from Michael Jordan to Derek Jeter to Kobe Bryant.  We marvel at their ability to play on, through pain and years, achieving fame and success.  Few of us have had the opportunity to publicly celebrate the careers of other, less famous giants in their fields.  I’m delighted to cast the spotlight on one such unsung hero, Professor Kenneth B. Pyle, longtime historian and teacher at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies.  Ken – retiring after 51 consecutive years of teaching, which certainly qualifies him for MVP – has won numerous teaching awards over the years.  Equally important, he’s touched the lives and shaped the scholarship of thousands of young minds at the University.  His students speak of him fondly, whether they now serve in the State Department or teach at other universities around the nation.

I’ve had the good fortune to have had Dr. Pyle on the Jackson Foundation Board of Governors during my tenure on the staff.  He was a founding member of our Board, having forged a close alliance with Senator Jackson in the days when Ken headed what was to become the Jackson School, and Jackson sought Ken out for advice on China and U.S. foreign policy toward Asia.  Ken has spoken movingly of that seminal relationship, which began with Senator Jackson dropping by Ken’s office at the U.W. and peppering him with questions for two hours.  Jackson and Pyle shared a concern that there was a national shortage of people who truly understood the workings of Asian and Slavic countries, and both believed that an immersion in the study of these areas was critical to achieve an understanding in U.S.-China and U.S.-Soviet relations.  From that moment forward, Scoop and Ken collaborated – in enhancing international studies at the University, in traveling to China together in the early days of détente with China, and in mentoring young students.

Anne & Kenneth Pyle Professorship

We at the Jackson Foundation value the role that Professor Pyle has played at the Jackson School and at the University of Washington for the past 50-plus years.  We were delighted to name a recent professorship at the Jackson School in American foreign policy in honor of Anne H. H. and Kenneth B. Pyle out of respect and recognition of Ken’s major achievements in his field and his leadership of the Jackson School, and of his wife Anne’s integral partnership with Ken in that success.At the end of this month, there will be a public program to celebrate the career of Ken Pyle.  We invite you to join us for this substantive program, featuring distinguished professor T.J. Pempel, University of California Berkeley, and many top-level colleagues from the Jackson School.

Congratulations, Ken.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Now available: China’s Energy Crossroads Program

A few weeks ago the Jackson Foundation partnered with NBR on the launch of NBR’s new publication, China’s Energy Crossroads, the 2014 Energy Security Report.  We wrote about that Washington, DC event here.  Today we draw your attention to the edited audio from the session, which featured opening remarks by John Hempelmann, President of the Jackson Foundation, and Admiral Dennis C. Blair, member of NBR’s Board of Directors.

John Hempelmann, Foundation President
John Hempelmann, Jackson Foundation President

John Hempelmann opened the day by placing the topic in context:  “Secretary of State John Kerry recently described the U.S.-China relationship as ‘the most consequential in the world today. Period.’” John went on to underscore how that relationship meant that the U.S. and China must work together and strengthen their understanding of one another.  “Undeniably, energy plays a growing role in this relationship,” John concluded.  “As the world’s largest consumer of energy across a broad range of fuel choices, China is a key player in any discussion of energy security.”

Gannett on Panel 2_Wide ShotLi Bin, Counselor for Economic Affairs at the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C., reiterated how fundamental this issue is to the current Chinese government: “China is very serious about the shift from relying on investments in pollution-producing energy to something more sustainable.  China must strive for less emphasis on coal as well as using the direct utilization of coal in a more environmentally-friendly manner.”  Li Bin also described how pollution and climate issues have become central to politics at the local level in China:  “The reduction of emissions is now very important for local leaders.  They have signed on to targets with the central government.  If targets are not reached, there will be a conversation between local leaders and central government officials.”  Edited audio for this panel can be found here.

(l to r) Mikkal Herberg, NBR; Li Bin, Embassy, People’s Republic of China; Joanna Lewis, Georgetown University; Craig Gannett, Vice President, Jackson Foundation

Craig Gannett, the Foundation’s Vice President, spoke on a panel focused on U.S.-China Cooperation on Climate Change.  Commenting on the U.S. approach to climate change today, Craig characterized the U.S. as “making clear progress, but it’s messy and non-linear.”  Reflecting on the Obama Administration’s multi-step process toward climate policy, Craig described the Administration’s climate action plan as very broad.  “The centerpiece of the policy is new regulations under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act for existing power plants, which call for a 30% reduction of emissions below 2005 levels by 2030.”  Craig explained that since these rules have both “inside the fence” regulation – at the power plant itself, as well as “outside the fence” – in the economy’s demands for electricity – the EPA’s ability to regulate will be challenging.  “This is outside the ordinary domain of EPA, whose core authority is large sources of emissions.  To have EPA be responsible for a plan that is economy-wide is very ambitious and legally uncertain,” Craig explained.  “There is genuine jeopardy to the ‘outside the fence’ portions of that rule.”  He predicted that the rule, which becomes final next June, with state implementation the following June or later, will eventually come before the U.S. Supreme Court.  “It may survive, it may not.  It probably depends on who the next president is and therefore who replaces a couple of aging Supreme Court justices.”

To hear the entire audio of this very interesting session, please go to NBR’s Event site.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

China’s Energy Crossroads

Earlier this week, the Henry M. Jackson Foundation and the National Bureau of Asian Research launched NBR’s 2014 Energy Security Report at an event entitled “China’s Energy Crossroads:  Forging a New Energy and Environmental Balance.”  The event in Washington, DC, attracted a large, diverse, policy-oriented crowd with a particular interest in Asia-Pacific affairs and China’s growing energy demands.

Admiral Blair and John Hempelmann
Admiral Dennis C.  Blair and John Hempelmann, Foundation President

Admiral Dennis C. Blair, former United States Director of National Intelligence and member of NBR’s Board of Directors, started the day with a note of optimism on a few fronts:  one, the recent joint announcement by the U.S. and Chinese government outlining steps each country will take to reduce carbon emissions and the warming of the global climate.  This “bright spot” in U.S.-China relations, as another speaker referred to it, will provide leadership to other major countries on climate change politics.  He also emphasized that the Chinese middle class, increasingly vocal and unhappy about air and water pollution in China, is being heard by Chinese political elites and is contributing to a sense of urgency about the need to act on China’s environmental challenges.

Gannett on Panel 2_Wide Shot
Panel on China’s Energy Policy and Its Impact on U.S. – China Relations

I was struck at the event by the monumental nature of the challenge that China faces today, and the truth in the title – a crossroads – and its implications not just for China, but for the world.  China no longer has the luxury – to the extent that it had it at all – of focusing primarily on growth without regard to environmental consequences.  It must face the results of its laser-like intensity to grow the economy.  The good news is that China’s political elites are well aware of this now.  The more difficult part is figuring out how to deal effectively with all the myriad problems this poses:  to the healthcare system, to China’s regional partners and global allies and rivals, to domestic political concerns within China, to its military and strategic thinking as it seeks to reinforce its current energy resources and explore new avenues beyond fossil fuels.  China’s energy demands continue to be a driver of both foreign and domestic policies and a spur to innovate.  Its decisions will impact America, other regional powers in Asia, and beyond.

Mikkal E. Herberg and Li Bin
Mikkal E. Herberg, NBR and Li Zhidong, Nagaoka University of Technology

NBR’s 2014 Energy Security Report discusses these interconnected concerns in a series of highly readable, policy-oriented briefs intended to inform policymakers, energy specialists and Asia-watchers.  Free copies of the report are available here.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director